Hellofresh chicken over garlic parmesan spaghetti

Puppy UTI question m

2023.04.01 16:10 kaleicecreambar Puppy UTI question m

My 13 week old puppy was staying at my mother in laws house for a few weeks while I was out of town. When I got back she was showing symptoms of a bad UTI. I took her to the vet and a few hundred dollars later she's on antibiotics. I was going over if anything changed in her diet while I was gone and she said that she was sprinkling this type of seasoning on her food??? these ingredients CANT be good right!
INGREDIENTS: WHEAT FLOUR, SEA SALT, WHEY, GELATIN, CANE SUGAR, YEAST EXTRACT, CHICKEN FAT, NATURAL FLAVOR (CONTAINS TORULA YEAST), GARLIC, MALTODEXTRIN, TURKEY BONE BROTH, XANTHAN GUM, DEXTROSE, SALT, CARAMEL COLOR, CHICKEN BROTH, SPICES, ONION*, PAPRIKA, CITRIC ACID, VINEGAR. *DEHYDRATED
submitted by kaleicecreambar to puppy101 [link] [comments]


2023.04.01 05:42 sketchyvibes32 Italian Cuisine

Italian Cuisine submitted by sketchyvibes32 to coolguides [link] [comments]


2023.04.01 05:16 localtravelidea Top Vietnamese Snacks to Bring Home as Souvenirs

Top Vietnamese Snacks to Bring Home as Souvenirs
Vietnam is a food lover's paradise, and its unique and flavorful snacks are a highlight of its cuisine. Whether you're looking for something savory, sweet, or a bit of both, Vietnam has plenty of snacks to satisfy your cravings. If you're planning to visit Vietnam or know someone who is, bringing home some of these delicious snacks as souvenirs is a great way to share your experience and love for Vietnamese cuisine. In this article, we will explore the top Vietnamese snacks to bring home as souvenirs.
https://preview.redd.it/40ahobikx6ra1.jpg?width=760&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=5100b8f0b0be69c0614d9e801c1eae439cb455d6
1 - Banh Mi Nho - Mini Vietnamese Sandwich
Banh Mi Nho is a mini version of the classic Vietnamese sandwich that is perfect for snacking. These sandwiches come in a variety of flavors and fillings, including pork, chicken, and tofu, and can be found in most Vietnamese markets and bakeries. Banh Mi Nho is easy to pack and makes a great souvenir to share with friends and family.
2 - Goi Cuon - Fresh Spring Rolls
Goi Cuon is a fresh and healthy Vietnamese snack that is made with rice paper, shrimp, pork, and vegetables such as lettuce and mint. These rolls are often served with a peanut dipping sauce that adds a perfect balance of sweetness and spiciness. Goi Cuon is easy to pack and can be found in most Vietnamese markets and restaurants.
3 - Banh Trang Tron - Mixed Rice Paper
Banh Trang Tron is a popular snack in Vietnam that is made by mixing shredded rice paper with a variety of toppings such as dried squid, quail eggs, and green mango. The snack is then topped with peanuts and a sweet and sour sauce. Banh Trang Tron is a unique and flavorful snack that is perfect for sharing with friends and family back home.
4 - Bap Nuong - Grilled Corn on the Cob
Bap Nuong is a popular street food snack in Vietnam that is made by grilling corn on the cob over an open flame. The corn is then brushed with a mixture of butter and garlic before being sprinkled with salt and chili powder. Bap Nuong is a savory and delicious snack that is perfect for sharing with friends and family.
5 - Keo Me Xung - Sesame Peanut Candy
Keo Me Xung is a sweet and crunchy Vietnamese candy that is made with roasted peanuts, sesame seeds, and sugar. The candy is often sold in small packets and is a popular souvenir to bring home. Keo Me Xung is a great snack to enjoy on its own or to add to desserts such as ice cream or yogurt.
👉 Discover our full list of 13 best snacks in Vietnam
submitted by localtravelidea to u/localtravelidea [link] [comments]


2023.04.01 02:56 gottaabsquatulate I told the waiter I have an onion allergy and this is what he came back with….

I told the waiter I have an onion allergy and this is what he came back with….
I told the waiter I have an onion allergy— it’s more of an intolerance but things get bad if I consume onions or onion powder, so I typically go ahead and say allergy. He told me he was going to ask the chef what was safe to eat and came back with a “redacted” menu. I’m always really limited in what I can eat (onion powder is secretly in EVERYTHING) and the number of things crossed out is hilarious, but this is honestly the best customer service I’ve ever received 😭
submitted by gottaabsquatulate to ibs [link] [comments]


2023.03.31 23:27 tiskajancthulhu Superhot fermentation

Back in the good old days of covid and lot of time on my hands, I ordered from my local chili farm some hot chilis. With names such as "Orange Death" and "Dragon's breath" and promised Scoville scores over two point two million, I knew I was in for pain.
I tried piece of one with a large bowl of chili and regretted it. I could hardly talk, and felt the chili going down through my body. I was sweating all night with stomach pains and so very glad of the hand bidet on the toilet.
So I added about 3% salt, and some garlic to the chopped up chilis and vacuum packed them and put them on the shelf to think about what they had done.
About six months later I opened them up and tried again, having forgotten how bad it was. It was still close to inedible with a fire that burns hotter than the sun....twice.
So I put them in a jar in the fridge and vowed revenge, someday...
So now, two years after the initial fermentation, I tried them again. Wow! The flavour is fan-fing-tastic and the heat has been reduced to a slow burn, similar to a Serrano. I'm not blending them or adding vinegar or anything else, just putting bits on my chicken or in my rice.
I'm inspired now to do other superhots and see what I can do. And so happy I just wanted to share!
submitted by tiskajancthulhu to fermentation [link] [comments]


2023.03.31 22:41 KatAtWork Parmesan Cabbage Soup

Parmesan Cabbage Soup
This is delicious! Never made it before, but it's easy & tasty.
submitted by KatAtWork to tonightsdinner [link] [comments]


2023.03.31 18:05 JudgementKiryu Chicken and pork belly adobo ✨

Chicken and pork belly adobo ✨
Someone posted about different ways people like their adobo, so here is my dad’s recipe!
Note 1: I very much prefer chicken legs over thigh but obviously you can use whatever you want
For marinade/sauce: • 3/4 cup of soy sauce • 1/2 cup of cane vinegar • garlic, crushed (I love garlic so I used half of a bulb haha) • 1 star anise • 2 bay leaves
Note 2: I used Datu Puti brand but use what you have; regular white vinegar also works
Note 3: for best results, meat(s) should be marinating overnight! If you’re really hungry, I would still recommend marinating at least 6 hours
Instructions: 1. In 1 Tbsp of canola oil, sauté crushed garlic until browned (careful not to burn it unless you’re into that lol) 2. Remove crushed garlic; add your pork belly onto your pan, skin side down. Cook until skin is nicely browned. Do the same with your chicken 3. Once pork belly and chicken are browned, add the marinade into your pan. Cut heat down to med-low heat and simmer (I have had mine simmering for about 1.5 hours. I also periodically check and turn my meats)
My dad likes to make a pico de gallo-type salad(?) with kamatis, red cibuyas, cilantro, Serrano peppers, and a little bit of patis. Serve with rice!
((FYI, apologies if my instructions are weird, I am not good at writing recipes. I’m only good at eating 😔))
If this blows up, I’m telling my dad he’s famous hahaha
submitted by JudgementKiryu to filipinofood [link] [comments]


2023.03.31 13:03 Unable-Membership109 I had a win!

I was planning on fasting for two days. Instead I cooked 500 grams of mince meat, I added maybe 60 grams of butter, salt, pepper, garlic, 7 egg yolks and a heap of parmesan cheese. I added an extra egg yolk as I wanted some fat, plus I guess I wanted to fight the eating disorder. I ate probably one quarter. My tummy has been shrinking so I can't eat as much plus medicine side effects. It was yummy, and I've got left overs. I'm really glad I did this and I'm very proud of me. 😊
submitted by Unable-Membership109 to EDAnonymous [link] [comments]


2023.03.31 10:54 patscookingnow Spicy Sichuan Minced Meat with green beans and coconut Rice EUR2.- PP

A delicious and flavorful Sichuan minced meat dish with green beans, garlic, and bell peppers, served over a bed of creamy coconut rice, cooked to perfection in a microwave rice steamer.
Prep time: 20 minutes Cook time: 30 minutes Total time: 50 minutes Serves: 4
Equipment:
Ingredients:
Instructions:
  1. Rinse the jasmine rice under cold water until the water runs clear. Set aside.
  2. In a microwave rice steamer, combine the rinsed rice, coconut milk, and chicken powder. Stir well, secure the lid, and microwave according to your rice steamer's instructions or until the rice is tender and has absorbed the coconut milk. Let the rice stand, covered, for 5 minutes before fluffing with a fork.
  3. While the rice is cooking, heat 1 tablespoon of sesame oil in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the minced meat to the skillet and season it with salt and pepper. Stir-fry the meat until it is cooked through and starts to get crispy, about 8-10 minutes. Remove the meat from the skillet and set it aside.
  4. In the same skillet, add the remaining tablespoon of sesame oil, chopped garlic, and chopped red and green bell peppers. Stir-fry for 2-3 minutes, until the vegetables begin to soften.
  5. Add the frozen green beans to the skillet and stir-fry for an additional 3-4 minutes, or until they are heated through but still crisp-tender.
  6. Return the cooked minced meat to the skillet, and add the Spicy Sichuan Stir-Fry Sauce and dark soy sauce. Stir well to combine, and cook for an additional 2-3 minutes, until everything is heated through and the flavors have melded together.
  7. Taste the dish and adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper, if needed.
  8. To serve, spoon the coconut rice onto plates and top with the spicy Sichuan minced meat and green bean mixture.
  9. Enjoy your delicious Spicy Sichuan Minced Meat with Green Beans and Coconut Rice!
https://preview.redd.it/rnkglqutg1ra1.jpg?width=2992&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=d4b47e0ee52c152bd050dadc63074d7762e05910
submitted by patscookingnow to cookingtonight [link] [comments]


2023.03.31 10:50 patscookingnow Spicy Sichuan Minced Meat with Green Beans EUR2.- PP

A delicious and flavorful Sichuan minced meat dish with green beans, garlic, and bell peppers, served over a bed of creamy coconut rice, cooked to perfection in a microwave rice steamer.
Prep time: 20 minutes Cook time: 30 minutes Total time: 50 minutes Serves: 4
Equipment:
Ingredients:
Instructions:
  1. Rinse the jasmine rice under cold water until the water runs clear. Set aside.
  2. In a microwave rice steamer, combine the rinsed rice, coconut milk, and chicken powder. Stir well, secure the lid, and microwave according to your rice steamer's instructions or until the rice is tender and has absorbed the coconut milk. Let the rice stand, covered, for 5 minutes before fluffing with a fork.
  3. While the rice is cooking, heat 1 tablespoon of sesame oil in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the minced meat to the skillet and season it with salt and pepper. Stir-fry the meat until it is cooked through and starts to get crispy, about 8-10 minutes. Remove the meat from the skillet and set it aside.
  4. In the same skillet, add the remaining tablespoon of sesame oil, chopped garlic, and chopped red and green bell peppers. Stir-fry for 2-3 minutes, until the vegetables begin to soften.
  5. Add the frozen green beans to the skillet and stir-fry for an additional 3-4 minutes, or until they are heated through but still crisp-tender.
  6. Return the cooked minced meat to the skillet, and add the Spicy Sichuan Stir-Fry Sauce and dark soy sauce. Stir well to combine, and cook for an additional 2-3 minutes, until everything is heated through and the flavors have melded together.
  7. Taste the dish and adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper, if needed.
  8. To serve, spoon the coconut rice onto plates and top with the spicy Sichuan minced meat and green bean mixture.
  9. Enjoy your delicious Spicy Sichuan Minced Meat with Green Beans and Coconut Rice!
  10. Photo: https://imgur.com/a/3mvgaOv
submitted by patscookingnow to Cooking [link] [comments]


2023.03.31 10:48 patscookingnow Spicy Sichuan Minced Meat with green beans EUR2.- PP

A delicious and flavorful Sichuan minced meat dish with green beans, garlic, and bell peppers, served over a bed of creamy coconut rice, cooked to perfection in a microwave rice steamer.
Prep time: 20 minutes Cook time: 30 minutes Total time: 50 minutes Serves: 4
Equipment:
Ingredients:
Instructions:
  1. Rinse the jasmine rice under cold water until the water runs clear. Set aside.
  2. In a microwave rice steamer, combine the rinsed rice, coconut milk, and chicken powder. Stir well, secure the lid, and microwave according to your rice steamer's instructions or until the rice is tender and has absorbed the coconut milk. Let the rice stand, covered, for 5 minutes before fluffing with a fork.
  3. While the rice is cooking, heat 1 tablespoon of sesame oil in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the minced meat to the skillet and season it with salt and pepper. Stir-fry the meat until it is cooked through and starts to get crispy, about 8-10 minutes. Remove the meat from the skillet and set it aside.
  4. In the same skillet, add the remaining tablespoon of sesame oil, chopped garlic, and chopped red and green bell peppers. Stir-fry for 2-3 minutes, until the vegetables begin to soften.
  5. Add the frozen green beans to the skillet and stir-fry for an additional 3-4 minutes, or until they are heated through but still crisp-tender.
  6. Return the cooked minced meat to the skillet, and add the Spicy Sichuan Stir-Fry Sauce and dark soy sauce. Stir well to combine, and cook for an additional 2-3 minutes, until everything is heated through and the flavors have melded together.
  7. Taste the dish and adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper, if needed.
  8. To serve, spoon the coconut rice onto plates and top with the spicy Sichuan minced meat and green bean mixture.
  9. Enjoy your delicious Spicy Sichuan Minced Meat with Green Beans and Coconut Rice!
https://preview.redd.it/y9mfzrrvf1ra1.jpg?width=2992&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=d563fa04a09793ea29a891cecb43240c94f3ae8e
submitted by patscookingnow to chinesecooking [link] [comments]


2023.03.31 07:19 lakecitylocal To commemorate my (un)official ED diagnosis I’m gonna start posting some food I’ve made over the past few weeks. Here’s my Disaster Mac at 346 cals for 2 servings!

To commemorate my (un)official ED diagnosis I’m gonna start posting some food I’ve made over the past few weeks. Here’s my Disaster Mac at 346 cals for 2 servings!
I’ve only made this once so far but I’ll definitely do it again and better next time. Warning for those triggered by volume eating, this is very filling!
I originally made this with Bac’n bits, but after having made it I feel like it’d didn’t really make much of a difference so next time I’ll leave them out. So technically it was around ~375 but I’m still figuring stuff out.
I very loosely followed this recipe (with 2 servings instead of 4) but wound up having really different measurements for some parts, so I eyeballed a lot of it and measured as I went. This whole recipe is totally customizable for whatever cheese, pasta & additions you want, I used what I had on hand. If you struggle with Mac n cheese this is for you 🫶
225g/1 package Palmini Linguini, cut (60) 54g shredded fat free cheddar (87) 15g shredded reduced fat Mexican blend cheese (I added this because I hate FF cheddar on its own) (48) 10g grated Parmesan (35) 1 wedge Laughing Cow light cheese (30) 4g/1 tbsp nutritional yeast (15) 50g nonfat Greek yogurt (26) 85g chopped broccoli (20) 70g cut tomatoes (20) Whatever spices you want (I used s&p, garlic powder, onion powder, basil leaves, and Jane’s Krazy mixed up salt) Optional: sriracha (5)
  • Prep pasta according to package (For hearts of palm spaghetti, rinse well in hot water for several, several minutes, chop into more manageable sized pieces (maybe 2-4 inches/5-10 centimeters in length), and boil in a large pot of water for 5-10 minutes).
  • Drain pasta and return to pot. Turn off or lower the heat.
  • Add your cheeses, stirring well. Cover and let it sit for a sec.
  • After your cheese has melted, add Greek yogurt. If you want it creamier, add more. Stir to combine.
  • Add your spices and nutritional yeast. Stir it up!
  • Add your veggies and stir again. If you’d like to add a protein here you can do that as well (I used thawed chopped broccoli and cut tomatoes).
  • Serve however you like your pasta and cheese. I love it with sriracha (5) and Jane’s Krazy!
Makes 2 bowls. Macros for the whole pot are… Cals: 346. Fat: 7.7g. Carbs: 28.6g*. Protein: 39.3g. *If you’re interested according to MFP this has 17.5g net carbs!
submitted by lakecitylocal to goodrestrictionfood [link] [comments]


2023.03.31 03:25 lunagurl93 How to Bonnaroo, A Guide (Vol. 4)

Hi everyone, I’m late to the party this year! Every year as June approaches, I update my guides (What You Should Wear to Bonnaroo and How to Camp at Bonnaroo) with your comments from the previous year's posts and it has slowly grown!! I decided to compile both versions into one giant guide, and present to you: How to Bonnaroo, a Guide Vol. 4
\**NOTE - I have only ever done GA Camping, but there are still tips for all kinds of campers. I also realized after finally returning to The Farm last year, that there are likely holes of information that need to be updated with all the changes… Help me fill those in and leave your best pro tips to be written next year!! HAPPY ROO!!*
What you should wear to Bonnaroo: First of all, and most importantly, you should wear whatever you want to wear. People wear a variety of clothing at Bonnaroo… from rave gear, to full-on outfits, to t-shirts, to jerseys, to costumes, to toplessness. There is no right or wrong! The best recommendation is to DRESS FOR YOUR ROO. The days are long, and the weather is hot (and sometimes cold at night), there are 15+ hours of music daily and activities spread amongst miles of Farm. If you are planning to run all over and catch as many sets as possible, dress for comfort. Bring your cute outfit or two that you really want to wear for a photo, or to your favorite artist’s set, but then plan to change. Preparation really is key, but us Reddit Roovians got you, so let’s get into it!!!
PREPARE FOR ALL CONDITIONS. Pack sunscreen for the love of god, bring a hydration pack, and decide whether you want a rain jacket, poncho, or are cool with getting wet so be it. Bring a pair of sweatpants, a sweatshirt, and a long sleeve t-shirt. It can get shockingly cold at night and it’s nice to have options. At some point you’ll want to be cozy!!! Keep some warm clothes inside of your tent, then you won’t have to dig through your car trying to find them when you wake up in the middle of the night shivering.
PACKING. If you’ve planned an outfit, pack them separately to keep things quick/organized (like a gallon ziploc or Walmart sack). Overpack some practical clothes and keep them in a laundry basket. Maybe you don’t feel like wearing that planned outfit one day, maybe you get wet (rain, water slide, surprise champagne shower), maybe you get dirty and want to put on fresh clothing. Sunrise sets play until almost 5am, think about how many hours you’ll be wearing the same clothes! Bring 2-3 outfits per day, and if you can, purchase a locker! They’re a great place to store that extra outfit, sweatshirt, pair of shoes, etc. Remember, your campsite could be a 2+ mile round trip side adventure!
FOOT PROTECTION. In 2019 I walked 65 miles, and in 2022 I walked 54 miles, so you need to plan your footwear appropriately… and better yet, go above and beyond!!! Wear in your shoes and make sure they have good soles. Consider packing multiple types of shoes if you have space so you can change them. On god my favorite shoes to wear at Roo are Crocs, otherwise hiking boots or tennis shoes. A pair of flip-flops for mornings at camp are also key! Shoe inserts are another option you can look into. Pack band-aids, moleskin, cleaning/treating supplies, and thick socks (2 pairs per day). Be a pro, don’t wait to protect your feet until the damage is already done, I legit allocate 15mins of my morning to doctoring them. Med Tents will also give you band-aids and cleaning supplies!! PRO TIP: pack a designated feet soaking bowl and bring some epsom salt and/or do a ice water soak with that cooler water you’re about to dump! You can also freeze a canned good/water bottle and roll that under your foot #treatyofeet
EAR PROTECTION. Please wear it, please!!! There are so many brands now that make quality earplugs in a range of affordability. They do not drown out sound, I actually think they make it better. I use Eargasms.
PREPARE FOR CHAFING. Ladies, wear some biker shorts or fishnets. Gentlemen, pack that gold bond. Other recommendations: Body Glide and Boundreaux’s Butt Paste (a diaper rash cream that you can “slather on the inside of your thighs and walk in cool comfort”).
MASKS. Back in the day, the experts knew to wear a mask (or bandana) walking around Bonnaroo. There is seriously so much dust being kicked around, you’ll have a sore throat by day 3 and black boogers every night. The Other Stage was a dust storm by Sunday… bring something to cover your mouth, or be cool with swallowing mouthfuls of dirt.
LONG HAIR. I was unprepared to deal with my hair at my first Bonnaroo. It was knotted and thrown up in a bun by Saturday and Sunday. Pack some detangler, don’t forget a brush, maybe bring a small one for your backpack, and force yourself to deal with it before it gets worse. Don’t be afraid to ask someone to braid your hair around camp, someone would be delighted to do it for you! Keep a hair tie on your wrist at all times and extras in your fanny pack… one time a girl took a bobby pin out of her own hair for me haha! Fellas, if you have long hair, bring a sweatband.
Listen, don’t get me wrong… everyone at Bonnaroo looks ~cute as hell~ but the tenured attendees aren’t treating it like a fashion show, especially if they’re camping. Bring your favorite clothing… pack whatever brings you comfort. Your favorite t-shirt or Hawaiian shirt, anything with a trippy pattern, biker shorts and a bralette, and you’ll be good to go I promise! If you’re interested in purchasing Rave attire… check for local shops on Etsy and/or TikTok, shop at thrift stores for unique finds or look on Amazon! There are bigger brands like iHeartRaves and Dolls Kill, too.
While we’re at it, let’s knockout Showers & Bathrooms...
SHOWERING. You have a couple of options here:
  1. TIER 1 - Pay for a shower. Showers are available at most PLAZA locations and are in private stalls. They cost $10 during peak hours and $5 during “happy hour” (unless they change the pricing). For those that have been keeping up, I finally paid for my first (and second) shower at Bonnaroo y’all… and I have to say, both were totally worth it. I stomped my hungover ass over there with a caddy of supplies and floated my way back to camp wrapped in a towel with a hair turban thrown on, and it was glorious.
  2. TIER 2 - Buy a portable shower to set-up at camp. Here are basic, medium, pro examples of portable showers. This will require fetching water, or if you have space, bring gallons of water with you. They are cheap and if you keep them on the roof of your car, they will keep warm throughout the day for showers. You can also use these to brush your teeth and wash your hands without wasting your drinking water!
  3. Tier 3 - Take an Italian shower… body wipes, face wipes, vagina wipes (yes), deodorant, dry shampoo, etc. It gets the job done, isn’t time consuming, and no one can tell the difference between today’s and yesterday’s dirt.
A WORD ABOUT NUDITY. Just be considerate about it, lol. Swimsuits are an option if you’re worried, which are honestly comfortable to hang out in at camp when it’s hot AF, but it’s easier said than done to wiggle into a leotard behind a tapestry flowing with the wind.
GOING TO THE BATHROOM. I can’t have fun until I know I can safely take a shit, ok? It is what it is.
Last year there were porta potties that had metal doors and flushed near the campgrounds. They were still hot, but nicer than regular porta potties. However, they always had longer lines in the morning because they’re in more populous locations. If you can muster up the regular ole porta potty, I didn’t think they were too bad last year, but that could’ve been a low attendance thing. PRO TIP - bring your own roll of toilet paper and wet wipes, and don’t be afraid to yell out for TP if you need it… been there, done that!
In 2019 there were wristbands you could buy to access a regularly cleaned, better-than-a-normal-porta-potty porta potty, with a sink and air conditioning but I didn’t notice them in 2022? If you do see them, snag a wristband at the beginning of the weekend to squeeze every penny! This was a great place to wash your face and take care of other hygiene-related items, but they did have 3 stalls so aren’t entirely private.
In Centeroo, you’re looking at the same options here, but the key is to get familiar with all the bathrooms as your preferences and priorities will ebb and flow in this regard. Are you peeing for the second time during a set because you chugged a water or are you needing to take a minute and contemplate life? You don’t want to be frantic when the spicy pie hits… but you also don’t need to worry about letting everyone in line know that you’re going to shit your pants if you don’t get on a toilet ASAP, because everyone will gladly let you go… again, been there, done that (and you can also sneak in through the back if needed). For the love of god, please make sure the bathrooms in the back are taken. You can politely check if there are feet in a stall, most of the time 25% of stalls are unused and we’re standing there for no reason.
Last year the Where in the Woods bathrooms were DISGUSTING, as in I could smell them from 20 feet away, and I ended up walking to the closet camp bathrooms. Something to keep in mind but hopefully we see some improvement.
FINALLY, a pro tip for my ladies… I highly suggest purchasing some funnels, they changed my life. Just trust me on this one! There are one-time use and reusable options, and I use these: Pee Buddy. Fuck walking to the bathroom everytime you need to pee at camp once you’ve broken the seal, and tbh, once you get comfortable, fuck sitting on a porta potty at all when avoidable. These knees ain't made for squatting no more.
How to camp at Bonnaroo: If you’re worried about camping, don’t be, it’s a big part of the Bonnaroo experience and fun! You can do it!!!
GET YOUR MIND RIGHT. In 2019 I waited in the Hellsboro line for 16 hrs and got a less-than-desirable-camping-location, and I was not happy about it. BUT it turned out to be quiet, close to the bathrooms (but not too close), and we somehow managed to get an end-of-row spot. In 2022 I waited in NO car line, had a close location, and great neighbors… but it was a 120-degree sweltering heatwave, and legit still in the 90’s going to sleep for two days. We hunkered down under the canopy, wore swimsuits, played games and got through it. Your neighbors will take care of you, and you’ll take care of them… maybe you won’t interact at all. You’ll land where you’re meant to be, go into it with that mindset. Perhaps you’re camped by a “DJ” who blasts music all night, but once the weekend is said and done, it’ll all be a part of your beautiful memories and your “that one time, at Bonaroo'' stories, so embrace the adversities and go with the flow.
GET TO KNOW THE AREA AROUND YOUR CAMPGROUND. Is there a plaza close by? What amenities are offered there? Where are the closest bathrooms? Is there food nearby? Being familiar with your camp surroundings early on will set you up for success. It is especially important to know your pod number and to define some landmarks that can help find your campsite/row (unique flag, tapestry, etc.)
SAFETY MEASUREMENTS. Introduce yourself to your neighbors. Always keep your valuables locked in your car when you aren’t at camp, and bring an extra set of keys with you! If you are participating in “ACTIVITIES,” be weary of your surroundings and use good judgment.
BARE MINIMUM NEEDS
  1. Canopy. You NEED shade, and heavy duty stakes to hold it down… we don’t want that bitch floating away, AND IT WILL. Use a rubber mallet to get those stakes deep in the ground. There has been debate on whether mallets are allowed, but I’ve never had an issue getting mine in?
  2. Canopy Walls. This provides extra shade and privacy when needed. A lot of people use sheets or tapestries. You can also use shower curtains (the rings allow you to open/close them as you please).
  3. Sleeping Arrangements. I always use a tent (don’t forget your tent roof, poles, and stakes!), with an air mattress, fitted sheet, pillow, and blankets. HOWEVER, lots of people are quick to share that a cot or hammock are much breezier options as it does tend to get stuffy in your tent once the sun comes up. If you choose to go the cot/hammock route, make sure you bring warm clothes or a blanket in case it gets cold at night. If you are balling on a budget, I’ve known people to take their hammocks to The Grove and sleep. I’m a late night raver, so I expect to get 5 solid hours of sleep each night, and then usually take a power nap somewhere shady inside of Centeroo!
The weekend will be long, but if you have these items, you can survive! The OZARK brand from Walmart is durable and affordable if you need any of them. Consider practicing your set-up if you aren’t already comfortable setting up a canopy and tent… if you need help, ask your neighbors!
OTHER ESSENTIAL ITEMS
  1. Tarps (to keep dirt away or to keep your stuff dry)
  2. Flashlights (your campsite will be really dark at night)
  3. A portable fan with extra batteries (I have THIS one)
  4. Beach chairs, or something else to sit on, and a table.
  5. Squishy ear plugs that are comfortable to sleep in!
  6. A power inverter (only turn your car on when needed and be mindful of carbon monoxide poisoning!)
  7. A Bluetooth speaker to play some relaxing tunes at a low volume (because we’re respectable people) in your tent to help drown out noise and bust it out during the day for entertainment while you get ready!
COOLERS & COOKING/FOOD.
Unless camping is a larger part of your experience, stick to the basics when it comes to cooking. Breakfast and late-night snacks are the most practical to cook, and cooking at the beginning of the weekend to save money. You most likely won’t want to return to camp for lunch and there’s so many yummy vendors to try out!!!
Make sure everything you bring is high in protein or has nutritional value. Consider your perishables or plan to eat them early in the weekend. Handle as much preparation as possible beforehand… chop everything, season everything, mix everything. Pre-crack your eggs into a bottle so you don’t have to worry about them breaking! Protect your food with sealable containers, or vacuum seal it, so cooler water doesn’t ruin your food.
I have THIS portable stove top that uses butane, and pack a cast iron, nonstick skillet, and utensils to get the job done.
Things that are pre-made, like Uncrustables (PB&J) and Spaghetti O’s (only needs to be warmed) will save you time, and snacks like Cliff Bars or Beef Jerky are filling. If possible, use pre-cooked meals like packaged grilled chicken or salami to throw in a wrap or sandwich, you can pre-shred some rotisserie chicken too! Bags of frozen veggies are easy to heat up or bring bags or raw veggies and individual hummus packets for a fresh snack. Peanut butter is easy to put on anything. Collect sauce packets from restaurants – they are easier to bring than entire bottles, plus glass isn’t allowed inside!
Don’t forget to clean-up with… dish towels, Clorox wipes, extra water, etc. and beware of ants!!! Take out your trash daily.
Let’s talk about coolers… do some preliminary work so you don’t waste what you bring, and consider using multiple coolers if you have space. Perhaps a large/small cooler, or a food cooler and a drink cooler, as your drink cooler is likely to be opened more and it’s more critical to keep your food cold. Pre-chill your cooler the night before you leave with a bag of ice, and then add new ice with your food/drinks (which should all be cool/cold/frozen beforehand, too). A lot of people recommend using dry ice, but be sure you know how to handle it.
A word about alcohol: you can’t carry alcohol into Centeroo, but at camp each individual may bring in 2 cases of beer, 1.75 liter of hard liquor, and 2 boxes of wine. No kegs are allowed and no glass whatsoever. Also, the Craft Beer Exchange is really fun if that’s your thing!!!
BRING PLENTY OF HYDRATION. Liquid IVs are great and Pedialyte is a fan favorite, although I can’t stand the thickness of it, haha.
CONCLUSION. If you made it this far, thanks for reading, and if you’re feeling intimated, just remember… This post is 4-years of experience, written in my comedic style with other commenter’s pro tips weaved into my personal stories. No matter how much you plan, something unexpected you’re unprepared for will happen, and you’ll deal with it. Don’t be fooled, we’re all out there just trying to survive and having the best time of our lives!!!
submitted by lunagurl93 to bonnaroo [link] [comments]


2023.03.31 00:28 uk_kali Stuffed Tuscan Chicken with Asparagus

Stuffed Tuscan Chicken with Asparagus
Stuffed Tuscan Chicken with Asparagus by @thetastebunñy
➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖ Alert 📢 Follow 👈 For More Keto Tips and Keto Recipes.🇺🇸 ➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖ 1. Slice chicken breasts down the side to create a pocket & rub 1tbsp of olive oil over chicken 2. Season with 2tbsp of Kinders garlic butter seasoning 3. Bring 1/4 cup of diced sun-dried tomatoes, 1 1/2cup shredded mozzarella cheese, 1tbsp garlic, 1/2 cup of df cream cheese together in a bowl (mix well to create “stuffing”) 4. Stuff your chicken breasts, then add 4-5 asparagus spears per breast 5. Cover baking dish with aluminum foil 6. Bake in oven at 375 for 20min 7. While the chicken is baking, prep sauce 8. In a skillet on medium heat stir in 1tbsp butter, 1tbsp garlic, 1tbsp paprika, 1 cup chicken broth, 1/4 cup sun-dried tomatoes & 2tbsp df cream cheese 9. Reduce heat & simmer for 3min 10. Take chicken out (after the 20min), pour in sauce & top chicken with some more mozzarella cheese 11. Cover & put back in oven for an additional 15min -
➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖
submitted by uk_kali to u/uk_kali [link] [comments]


2023.03.30 23:48 manbunsandkayaks I’m so excited that I wanted to share here of my slam dunk side dish today. My guiltless gratin! Low carb, low cal, low fat, high protein gratin

So I posted this originally on CICO and tried to cross post but since there’s a photo it won’t allow, and unfortunately I cannot post a link in this sub either. So below is the copy and paste of my post, feel free to visit CICO to see the pic as well!
I really wish I took a pic of it out of the oven but I was too excited and curious to think of it. Plus I had a hungry husband who just finished his long wrong right before dinner.
I had some squash and wanted to play a bit instead of the basic sautéed squash and such. I tried looking up recipes and came across a low carb keto one. Which is all well and good but let’s be real it’s sooooo calorie dense and it would send the meal right over the roof. Anyways, I then found a “lighter one” but it just sounded … not good. And flavorless. So I combined a little bit of both and made this magical squash gratin.
I’m glad I did the tweaks i did - now trust me. This sounds disgusting. And even when my husband asked how I made it I said it might be a little gross sounding so he said ok then wait for me to finish it then tell me … and he was VERY surprised by the ingredients!
3 yellow squash sliced 1 elephant garlic clove 1 red onion 1/4 c mozzarella 1 container of the small Fage 0% (nonfat Greek yogurt) 1/2 low fat small curd cottage cheese 1/4 c of nutritional yeast
Sauté the squash separately (with a generous amount of salt) then lay in a colander to drain the excess water. Sauté the onions and garlic when done mix the veggies together in a large bowl tossing in herbs, salt, pepper (or whatever seasoning you want)
Separately bowl add cottage cheese mozz yogurt nutritional yeast, mix that together well, then fold it in with the squash onions and garlic, put in a bake safe pan at 425 and bake for 15-20 min (until brown on top) then let rest for like 15 min so it gets thicker as it cools
My creation utilized the nutritional yeast to get the cheesier flavor and a small amount of mozz. I truly wouldn’t change a thing … MAYBE I’d sprinkle a little bit of cheese on top to bake (mix in Parmesan and mozz blend or something) but honestly that’s not a make it or break it.
The pic attached is 1/3 serving. The whole recipe I wrote (above) was actually for TWO servings. So for two servings it comes out to…. Drum rolllllll
Calories: 310 Protein: 31.9g Carbs: 33.8g Fat: 8.4g
submitted by manbunsandkayaks to Cooking [link] [comments]


2023.03.30 22:30 HoardingBotanist Restaurant-Quality Tsukemen "Dipping Noodles" (ft. Ramen_Lord)

Tsukemen has got to be one of the most underrepresented styles of Ramen here in the West. Think of Tsukemen as "dipping noodles," well, because that's exactly how they're eaten. Chubby, long noodles are lowered into a viscous, gravy-like soup for an end result that is much richer tasting (and feeling) than even the richest of Tonkotsu bowls.
A few years ago when I was in Japan, I tried a bowl of Tsukemen and it changed the way I view ramen in the best way possible. However, here in the States there are few places (outside of populous cities) that do Tsukemen well, if at all. So in an attempt to spread Tsukemen love I've teamed up with the Kobe Bryant of Ramen Making (for us Westerners), Mike Satinover... but you Ramenheads probably know him as Ramen_Lord.
Mike's knowledge of Ramen is incredible; he even once named a shop who's name eluded me from a mere description of the noodles and setting... I mean... the guy is encyclopedic with his noodle wisdom. Anyways, the full recipe to make a sped up (but not lacking in quality) Tsukemen AT HOME is listed out below. We'll cover it all from soup to toppings. I've also included a link to a cook-along video where Mike takes us on a deep dive into the style. I hope you dig it! Let me know if you have any questions, happy to help if I can.
INGREDIENTS
Soup
  1. Add water and pork bones to a pressure cooker, at least an 8-quart size cooker, but preferably 10-quart. Bring to a boil, and skim the scum, until little to none rises, around 20 minutes.
  2. Roll the pork belly into a cylinder with kitchen twine, add to the pot after skimming. Cover, bring to high pressure, cook for 1 hour.
  3. While cooking, remove the toenails of the chicken feet.
  4. Open the pressure cooker using the fast release setting, remove the belly, add to a ziplock bag with chashu marinade for two hours at room temperature, agitating as needed to ensure coverage.
  5. Add the chicken backs and chicken feet to the pressure cooker. Close the pressure cooker, bring to high pressure again, cook for 1 hour.
  6. Fast release again, open the pressure cooker. Add onion, ginger, and garlic. Boil for 30 minutes uncovered.
  7. In a stock bag or cheesecloth, add kombu, niboshi, katsuobushi, and sababushi and place in to the pot. Add the gyofun directly to the soup. Cook for 20 minutes at a boil.
  8. Remove and discard the stock bag, Strain the soup, reserving the pulp of bones and meat and vegetables. Do not discard pulp.
  9. Dig through the pulp to remove large bones, like femurs, or extra chunky neck bones. You’ll notice at this stage that the bones are quite brittle and can break under pressure. Any bones you can crumble in your fingers are good to keep.
  10. Blend ⅔ the bones, meat, and vegetables in a blender with enough soup to make a slurry.
  11. Combine slurry with remaining soup. Reserve until needed.
Chashu
  1. Add cooked chashu to a ziplock bag. Add soy sauce and mirin to the bag. Remove air from the bag and let marinade at room temperature, rotating every so often until the soup is complete.
Shoyu Egg
  1. Add as many eggs as you’d like to boiling water and cook for 7 minutes. Immediately transfer the eggs to an ice bath. Allow the eggs to cool fully, then peel.
  2. Mix water, soy sauce and mirin in a container. In a separate, resealable container, add the eggs and pour over enough brine to cover the eggs. Allow the eggs to marinade in the soy mixture, refrigerated, for 2 days before using.
Tare
  1. Mix well, refrigerate until needed.
To Assemble
  1. Place the bowl for the noodles and the bowl for the soup in your oven at the lowest temperature.
  2. Lay in ramen noodles to the warm noodle bowl. Top with two slices of chashu, a shoyu egg sliced down the middle, menma, two slices of nori and a lime wedge.
  3. Add soup to the warm soup bowl. Top with scallions and gyofun.
  4. Grab the noodles with your chopsticks, dip into the soup and slurp.
Full video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J18o5atHUf8&ab_channel=OmnivorousAdam
submitted by HoardingBotanist to Chefit [link] [comments]


2023.03.30 22:29 HoardingBotanist Tsukemen "Dipping Noodles" (Ramen's Brother)

Tsukemen has got to be one of the most underrepresented styles of Ramen here in the West. Think of Tsukemen as "dipping noodles," well, because that's exactly how they're eaten. Chubby, long noodles are lowered into a viscous, gravy-like soup for an end result that is much richer tasting (and feeling) than even the richest of Tonkotsu bowls.
A few years ago when I was in Japan, I tried a bowl of Tsukemen and it changed the way I view ramen in the best way possible. However, here in the States there are few places (outside of populous cities) that do Tsukemen well, if at all. So in an attempt to spread Tsukemen love I've teamed up with the Kobe Bryant of Ramen Making (for us Westerners), Mike Satinover... but you Ramenheads probably know him as Ramen_Lord.
Mike's knowledge of Ramen is incredible; he even once named a shop who's name eluded me from a mere description of the noodles and setting... I mean... the guy is encyclopedic with his noodle wisdom. Anyways, the full recipe to make a sped up (but not lacking in quality) Tsukemen AT HOME is listed out below. We'll cover it all from soup to toppings. I've also included a link to a cook-along video where Mike takes us on a deep dive into the style. I hope you dig it! Let me know if you have any questions, happy to help if I can.
INGREDIENTS
Soup
  1. Add water and pork bones to a pressure cooker, at least an 8-quart size cooker, but preferably 10-quart. Bring to a boil, and skim the scum, until little to none rises, around 20 minutes.
  2. Roll the pork belly into a cylinder with kitchen twine, add to the pot after skimming. Cover, bring to high pressure, cook for 1 hour.
  3. While cooking, remove the toenails of the chicken feet.
  4. Open the pressure cooker using the fast release setting, remove the belly, add to a ziplock bag with chashu marinade for two hours at room temperature, agitating as needed to ensure coverage.
  5. Add the chicken backs and chicken feet to the pressure cooker. Close the pressure cooker, bring to high pressure again, cook for 1 hour.
  6. Fast release again, open the pressure cooker. Add onion, ginger, and garlic. Boil for 30 minutes uncovered.
  7. In a stock bag or cheesecloth, add kombu, niboshi, katsuobushi, and sababushi and place in to the pot. Add the gyofun directly to the soup. Cook for 20 minutes at a boil.
  8. Remove and discard the stock bag, Strain the soup, reserving the pulp of bones and meat and vegetables. Do not discard pulp.
  9. Dig through the pulp to remove large bones, like femurs, or extra chunky neck bones. You’ll notice at this stage that the bones are quite brittle and can break under pressure. Any bones you can crumble in your fingers are good to keep.
  10. Blend ⅔ the bones, meat, and vegetables in a blender with enough soup to make a slurry.
  11. Combine slurry with remaining soup. Reserve until needed.
Chashu
  1. Add cooked chashu to a ziplock bag. Add soy sauce and mirin to the bag. Remove air from the bag and let marinade at room temperature, rotating every so often until the soup is complete.
Shoyu Egg
  1. Add as many eggs as you’d like to boiling water and cook for 7 minutes. Immediately transfer the eggs to an ice bath. Allow the eggs to cool fully, then peel.
  2. Mix water, soy sauce and mirin in a container. In a separate, resealable container, add the eggs and pour over enough brine to cover the eggs. Allow the eggs to marinade in the soy mixture, refrigerated, for 2 days before using.
Tare
  1. Mix well, refrigerate until needed.
To Assemble
  1. Place the bowl for the noodles and the bowl for the soup in your oven at the lowest temperature.
  2. Lay in ramen noodles to the warm noodle bowl. Top with two slices of chashu, a shoyu egg sliced down the middle, menma, two slices of nori and a lime wedge.
  3. Add soup to the warm soup bowl. Top with scallions and gyofun.
  4. Grab the noodles with your chopsticks, dip into the soup and slurp.
Full video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J18o5atHUf8&ab_channel=OmnivorousAdam
submitted by HoardingBotanist to asianeats [link] [comments]


2023.03.30 22:29 HoardingBotanist Tsukemen "Dipping Noodles" (Ramen's Brother)

Tsukemen has got to be one of the most underrepresented styles of Ramen here in the West. Think of Tsukemen as "dipping noodles," well, because that's exactly how they're eaten. Chubby, long noodles are lowered into a viscous, gravy-like soup for an end result that is much richer tasting (and feeling) than even the richest of Tonkotsu bowls.
A few years ago when I was in Japan, I tried a bowl of Tsukemen and it changed the way I view ramen in the best way possible. However, here in the States there are few places (outside of populous cities) that do Tsukemen well, if at all. So in an attempt to spread Tsukemen love I've teamed up with the Kobe Bryant of Ramen Making (for us Westerners), Mike Satinover... but you Ramenheads probably know him as Ramen_Lord.
Mike's knowledge of Ramen is incredible; he even once named a shop who's name eluded me from a mere description of the noodles and setting... I mean... the guy is encyclopedic with his noodle wisdom. Anyways, the full recipe to make a sped up (but not lacking in quality) Tsukemen AT HOME is listed out below. We'll cover it all from soup to toppings. I've also included a link to a cook-along video where Mike takes us on a deep dive into the style. I hope you dig it! Let me know if you have any questions, happy to help if I can.
INGREDIENTS
Soup
  1. Add water and pork bones to a pressure cooker, at least an 8-quart size cooker, but preferably 10-quart. Bring to a boil, and skim the scum, until little to none rises, around 20 minutes.
  2. Roll the pork belly into a cylinder with kitchen twine, add to the pot after skimming. Cover, bring to high pressure, cook for 1 hour.
  3. While cooking, remove the toenails of the chicken feet.
  4. Open the pressure cooker using the fast release setting, remove the belly, add to a ziplock bag with chashu marinade for two hours at room temperature, agitating as needed to ensure coverage.
  5. Add the chicken backs and chicken feet to the pressure cooker. Close the pressure cooker, bring to high pressure again, cook for 1 hour.
  6. Fast release again, open the pressure cooker. Add onion, ginger, and garlic. Boil for 30 minutes uncovered.
  7. In a stock bag or cheesecloth, add kombu, niboshi, katsuobushi, and sababushi and place in to the pot. Add the gyofun directly to the soup. Cook for 20 minutes at a boil.
  8. Remove and discard the stock bag, Strain the soup, reserving the pulp of bones and meat and vegetables. Do not discard pulp.
  9. Dig through the pulp to remove large bones, like femurs, or extra chunky neck bones. You’ll notice at this stage that the bones are quite brittle and can break under pressure. Any bones you can crumble in your fingers are good to keep.
  10. Blend ⅔ the bones, meat, and vegetables in a blender with enough soup to make a slurry.
  11. Combine slurry with remaining soup. Reserve until needed.
Chashu
  1. Add cooked chashu to a ziplock bag. Add soy sauce and mirin to the bag. Remove air from the bag and let marinade at room temperature, rotating every so often until the soup is complete.
Shoyu Egg
  1. Add as many eggs as you’d like to boiling water and cook for 7 minutes. Immediately transfer the eggs to an ice bath. Allow the eggs to cool fully, then peel.
  2. Mix water, soy sauce and mirin in a container. In a separate, resealable container, add the eggs and pour over enough brine to cover the eggs. Allow the eggs to marinade in the soy mixture, refrigerated, for 2 days before using.
Tare
  1. Mix well, refrigerate until needed.
To Assemble
  1. Place the bowl for the noodles and the bowl for the soup in your oven at the lowest temperature.
  2. Lay in ramen noodles to the warm noodle bowl. Top with two slices of chashu, a shoyu egg sliced down the middle, menma, two slices of nori and a lime wedge.
  3. Add soup to the warm soup bowl. Top with scallions and gyofun.
  4. Grab the noodles with your chopsticks, dip into the soup and slurp.
Full video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J18o5atHUf8&ab_channel=OmnivorousAdam
submitted by HoardingBotanist to Noodles [link] [comments]


2023.03.30 22:28 HoardingBotanist Tsukemen "Dipping Noodles" (Ramen's Brother)

Tsukemen has got to be one of the most underrepresented styles of Ramen here in the West. Think of Tsukemen as "dipping noodles," well, because that's exactly how they're eaten. Chubby, long noodles are lowered into a viscous, gravy-like soup for an end result that is much richer tasting (and feeling) than even the richest of Tonkotsu bowls.
A few years ago when I was in Japan, I tried a bowl of Tsukemen and it changed the way I view ramen in the best way possible. However, here in the States there are few places (outside of populous cities) that do Tsukemen well, if at all. So in an attempt to spread Tsukemen love I've teamed up with the Kobe Bryant of Ramen Making (for us Westerners), Mike Satinover... but you Ramenheads probably know him as Ramen_Lord.
Mike's knowledge of Ramen is incredible; he even once named a shop who's name eluded me from a mere description of the noodles and setting... I mean... the guy is encyclopedic with his noodle wisdom. Anyways, the full recipe to make a sped up (but not lacking in quality) Tsukemen AT HOME is listed out below. We'll cover it all from soup to toppings. I've also included a link to a cook-along video where Mike takes us on a deep dive into the style. I hope you dig it! Let me know if you have any questions, happy to help if I can.
INGREDIENTS
Soup
  1. Add water and pork bones to a pressure cooker, at least an 8-quart size cooker, but preferably 10-quart. Bring to a boil, and skim the scum, until little to none rises, around 20 minutes.
  2. Roll the pork belly into a cylinder with kitchen twine, add to the pot after skimming. Cover, bring to high pressure, cook for 1 hour.
  3. While cooking, remove the toenails of the chicken feet.
  4. Open the pressure cooker using the fast release setting, remove the belly, add to a ziplock bag with chashu marinade for two hours at room temperature, agitating as needed to ensure coverage.
  5. Add the chicken backs and chicken feet to the pressure cooker. Close the pressure cooker, bring to high pressure again, cook for 1 hour.
  6. Fast release again, open the pressure cooker. Add onion, ginger, and garlic. Boil for 30 minutes uncovered.
  7. In a stock bag or cheesecloth, add kombu, niboshi, katsuobushi, and sababushi and place in to the pot. Add the gyofun directly to the soup. Cook for 20 minutes at a boil.
  8. Remove and discard the stock bag, Strain the soup, reserving the pulp of bones and meat and vegetables. Do not discard pulp.
  9. Dig through the pulp to remove large bones, like femurs, or extra chunky neck bones. You’ll notice at this stage that the bones are quite brittle and can break under pressure. Any bones you can crumble in your fingers are good to keep.
  10. Blend ⅔ the bones, meat, and vegetables in a blender with enough soup to make a slurry.
  11. Combine slurry with remaining soup. Reserve until needed.
Chashu
  1. Add cooked chashu to a ziplock bag. Add soy sauce and mirin to the bag. Remove air from the bag and let marinade at room temperature, rotating every so often until the soup is complete.
Shoyu Egg
  1. Add as many eggs as you’d like to boiling water and cook for 7 minutes. Immediately transfer the eggs to an ice bath. Allow the eggs to cool fully, then peel.
  2. Mix water, soy sauce and mirin in a container. In a separate, resealable container, add the eggs and pour over enough brine to cover the eggs. Allow the eggs to marinade in the soy mixture, refrigerated, for 2 days before using.
Tare
  1. Mix well, refrigerate until needed.
To Assemble
  1. Place the bowl for the noodles and the bowl for the soup in your oven at the lowest temperature.
  2. Lay in ramen noodles to the warm noodle bowl. Top with two slices of chashu, a shoyu egg sliced down the middle, menma, two slices of nori and a lime wedge.
  3. Add soup to the warm soup bowl. Top with scallions and gyofun.
  4. Grab the noodles with your chopsticks, dip into the soup and slurp.
Full video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J18o5atHUf8&ab_channel=OmnivorousAdam
submitted by HoardingBotanist to soup [link] [comments]


2023.03.30 22:27 HoardingBotanist Chewy, Thick Tsukemen "Dipping Noodles" at Home (ft. Ramen_Lord)

Tsukemen has got to be one of the most underrepresented styles of Ramen here in the West. Think of Tsukemen as "dipping noodles," well, because that's exactly how they're eaten. Chubby, long noodles are lowered into a viscous, gravy-like soup for an end result that is much richer tasting (and feeling) than even the richest of Tonkotsu bowls.
A few years ago when I was in Japan, I tried a bowl of Tsukemen and it changed the way I view ramen in the best way possible. However, here in the States there are few places (outside of populous cities) that do Tsukemen well, if at all. So in an attempt to spread Tsukemen love I've teamed up with the Kobe Bryant of Ramen Making (for us Westerners), Mike Satinover... but you Ramenheads probably know him as Ramen_Lord.
Mike's knowledge of Ramen is incredible; he even once named a shop who's name eluded me from a mere description of the noodles and setting... I mean... the guy is encyclopedic with his noodle wisdom. Anyways, the full recipe to make a sped up (but not lacking in quality) Tsukemen AT HOME is listed out below. We'll cover it all from soup to toppings. I've also included a link to a cook-along video where Mike takes us on a deep dive into the style. I hope you dig it! Let me know if you have any questions, happy to help if I can.

INGREDIENTS

Soup
  1. Add water and pork bones to a pressure cooker, at least an 8-quart size cooker, but preferably 10-quart. Bring to a boil, and skim the scum, until little to none rises, around 20 minutes.
  2. Roll the pork belly into a cylinder with kitchen twine, add to the pot after skimming. Cover, bring to high pressure, cook for 1 hour.
  3. While cooking, remove the toenails of the chicken feet.
  4. Open the pressure cooker using the fast release setting, remove the belly, add to a ziplock bag with chashu marinade for two hours at room temperature, agitating as needed to ensure coverage.
  5. Add the chicken backs and chicken feet to the pressure cooker. Close the pressure cooker, bring to high pressure again, cook for 1 hour.
  6. Fast release again, open the pressure cooker. Add onion, ginger, and garlic. Boil for 30 minutes uncovered.
  7. In a stock bag or cheesecloth, add kombu, niboshi, katsuobushi, and sababushi and place in to the pot. Add the gyofun directly to the soup. Cook for 20 minutes at a boil.
  8. Remove and discard the stock bag, Strain the soup, reserving the pulp of bones and meat and vegetables. Do not discard pulp.
  9. Dig through the pulp to remove large bones, like femurs, or extra chunky neck bones. You’ll notice at this stage that the bones are quite brittle and can break under pressure. Any bones you can crumble in your fingers are good to keep.
  10. Blend ⅔ the bones, meat, and vegetables in a blender with enough soup to make a slurry.
  11. Combine slurry with remaining soup. Reserve until needed.
Chashu
  1. Add cooked chashu to a ziplock bag. Add soy sauce and mirin to the bag. Remove air from the bag and let marinade at room temperature, rotating every so often until the soup is complete.
Shoyu Egg
  1. Add as many eggs as you’d like to boiling water and cook for 7 minutes. Immediately transfer the eggs to an ice bath. Allow the eggs to cool fully, then peel.
  2. Mix water, soy sauce and mirin in a container. In a separate, resealable container, add the eggs and pour over enough brine to cover the eggs. Allow the eggs to marinade in the soy mixture, refrigerated, for 2 days before using.
Tare
  1. Mix well, refrigerate until needed.
To Assemble
  1. Place the bowl for the noodles and the bowl for the soup in your oven at the lowest temperature.
  2. Lay in ramen noodles to the warm noodle bowl. Top with two slices of chashu, a shoyu egg sliced down the middle, menma, two slices of nori and a lime wedge.
  3. Add soup to the warm soup bowl. Top with scallions and gyofun.
  4. Grab the noodles with your chopsticks, dip into the soup and slurp.
Full video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J18o5atHUf8&ab_channel=OmnivorousAdam
submitted by HoardingBotanist to OmnivorousAdam [link] [comments]


2023.03.30 22:27 HoardingBotanist Chewy, Thick Tsukemen "Dipping Noodles" at Home (ft. Ramen_Lord)

Tsukemen has got to be one of the most underrepresented styles of Ramen here in the West. Think of Tsukemen as "dipping noodles," well, because that's exactly how they're eaten. Chubby, long noodles are lowered into a viscous, gravy-like soup for an end result that is much richer tasting (and feeling) than even the richest of Tonkotsu bowls.
A few years ago when I was in Japan, I tried a bowl of Tsukemen and it changed the way I view ramen in the best way possible. However, here in the States there are few places (outside of populous cities) that do Tsukemen well, if at all. So in an attempt to spread Tsukemen love I've teamed up with the Kobe Bryant of Ramen Making (for us Westerners), Mike Satinover... but you Ramenheads probably know him as Ramen_Lord.
Mike's knowledge of Ramen is incredible; he even once named a shop who's name eluded me from a mere description of the noodles and setting... I mean... the guy is encyclopedic with his noodle wisdom. Anyways, the full recipe to make a sped up (but not lacking in quality) Tsukemen AT HOME is listed out below. We'll cover it all from soup to toppings. I've also included a link to a cook-along video where Mike takes us on a deep dive into the style. I hope you dig it! Let me know if you have any questions, happy to help if I can.

INGREDIENTS

Soup
  1. Add water and pork bones to a pressure cooker, at least an 8-quart size cooker, but preferably 10-quart. Bring to a boil, and skim the scum, until little to none rises, around 20 minutes.
  2. Roll the pork belly into a cylinder with kitchen twine, add to the pot after skimming. Cover, bring to high pressure, cook for 1 hour.
  3. While cooking, remove the toenails of the chicken feet.
  4. Open the pressure cooker using the fast release setting, remove the belly, add to a ziplock bag with chashu marinade for two hours at room temperature, agitating as needed to ensure coverage.
  5. Add the chicken backs and chicken feet to the pressure cooker. Close the pressure cooker, bring to high pressure again, cook for 1 hour.
  6. Fast release again, open the pressure cooker. Add onion, ginger, and garlic. Boil for 30 minutes uncovered.
  7. In a stock bag or cheesecloth, add kombu, niboshi, katsuobushi, and sababushi and place in to the pot. Add the gyofun directly to the soup. Cook for 20 minutes at a boil.
  8. Remove and discard the stock bag, Strain the soup, reserving the pulp of bones and meat and vegetables. Do not discard pulp.
  9. Dig through the pulp to remove large bones, like femurs, or extra chunky neck bones. You’ll notice at this stage that the bones are quite brittle and can break under pressure. Any bones you can crumble in your fingers are good to keep.
  10. Blend ⅔ the bones, meat, and vegetables in a blender with enough soup to make a slurry.
  11. Combine slurry with remaining soup. Reserve until needed.
Chashu
  1. Add cooked chashu to a ziplock bag. Add soy sauce and mirin to the bag. Remove air from the bag and let marinade at room temperature, rotating every so often until the soup is complete.
Shoyu Egg
  1. Add as many eggs as you’d like to boiling water and cook for 7 minutes. Immediately transfer the eggs to an ice bath. Allow the eggs to cool fully, then peel.
  2. Mix water, soy sauce and mirin in a container. In a separate, resealable container, add the eggs and pour over enough brine to cover the eggs. Allow the eggs to marinade in the soy mixture, refrigerated, for 2 days before using.
Tare
  1. Mix well, refrigerate until needed.
To Assemble
  1. Place the bowl for the noodles and the bowl for the soup in your oven at the lowest temperature.
  2. Lay in ramen noodles to the warm noodle bowl. Top with two slices of chashu, a shoyu egg sliced down the middle, menma, two slices of nori and a lime wedge.
  3. Add soup to the warm soup bowl. Top with scallions and gyofun.
  4. Grab the noodles with your chopsticks, dip into the soup and slurp.
Full video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J18o5atHUf8&ab_channel=OmnivorousAdam
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2023.03.30 20:42 roypdx 3/30/2023 Polaris menu SFO-NRT

Kind of miss the short rib
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